Honey Facts

fresh raw honey with honey dipper jar

Buying Honey in Bulk

You already know the health benefits of raw honey, but what about buying honey in bulk? This could become one of the smartest purchases you make since this honey type is usable for numerous purposes at home throughout the year.

Available in One-Gallon, 3.5 and 5 Gallon Pails:

Take a look at these ten reasons buying honey in bulk should become a top priority over purchasing lesser quality and smaller supplies in local stores.

Buy Your Honey in Bulk From Your Local Area

Those of you who live in the Pacific Northwest already have the advantage of having local farms that cultivate raw honey all year long. They sell it to local stores, something we also do at Artie’s Harvest.

Where can you find our raw honey to buy in bulk? You can’t find it in all mainstream stores since so many grocery locations still sell processed varieties. When it comes to quality that's why Artie's Harvest honey is the best. Our tracebility details how our honey comes direclty from bee farmers. There's no additives, so you can be sure our honey is 100% pure unfiltered raw honey.

If you want the real deal, you have to visit specific stores willing to sell it. Fortunately, some mainstream grocery outlets do sell ours here in the NW, like Albertson’s and Fred Meyer.

Stores where you can find it in either Oregon, Washington, Idaho, or Alaska:

Oregon

You can locate our raw honey in bulk at only two major Oregon grocery outlets: QFC and Fred Meyer.

All QFC stores are in Portland, though Fred Meyer stores are a little more expansive throughout the Oregon valley. For instance, you can find our honey in Fred Meyers located everywhere from Grants Pass to Salem.

The honey comes in as big as a 24-ounce jar to give you the best benefits of bulk buying.

Washington

Our raw honey is in Washington State more than anywhere else. This includes in Albertson’s, QFC, Safeway (our largest supplier), plus Fred Meyer.

Those stores have locations across the state.

Idaho

Idaho residents can also buy us in bulk through the above stores, other than QFC. While in more limited locations here, we want to reach out to as many people as possible in the NW.

Alaska

Yes, Alaskans can also find our honey. It’s only available in a prominent grocery outlet there: Carr’s. Twelve locations of Carr’s stores in Alaska currently sell our products.

Why Buying Online is a Smart Choice

If you’re going to buy raw honey in bulk, buying online is always the smarter choice. One good reason is you know you’re getting it from a legitimate source.

Buying in a grocery store can sometimes be a riskier prospect since so many stores continue to sell honey that’s far from raw. Besides, you can’t buy it in bulk very often there either.

You can buy even larger bulk supplies of raw honey directly through our website at Artie’s Harvest. It’s all American-made, local, and organic.

What is Wildflower Honey?

No doubt you’re curious about what wildflower honey is and why it’s a good honey product to buy in bulk.

Despite being called “wildflower honey”, it doesn’t come from any specific type of wildflower. It just means honey that comes from any flower growing in the wild.

One thing you can count on with our wildflower honey is it comes from wildflowers in the local area, meaning it’s mostly American made.

Buying local is also important so you’re assured the honey is never blended with other honey types. In some parts of the country, blending sometimes occurs to create more consistency in the look of the product.

What wildflower honey looks like differs based on the type of wildflower it comes from. However, you can usually identify it as a light color with a fruity taste. Any bought during the summer or fall will generally be darker in color because the wildflowers grew in a warmer environment.

Best of all, you can count on wildflower honey being 100% organic. Our organic brands are the only ones that come from beekeepers in other countries, namely Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina.

How Can You Store Raw Honey in Bulk Long-Term?

Perhaps you have concern that if you buy wildflower honey in bulk, it won’t last for any more than a couple of years.

After all, you probably want to use this type of honey for baking long down the road, something many chefs swear by. The good news is all raw honey lasts longer than you think, depending on how well it’s stored.

When buying in bulk, plan to buy well-sealed containers to store your honey in. Having them sealed tight could mean the honey lasting for decades. Some honey is known for lasting centuries (particularly from Ancient Egypt), more than proving its worth over the long-term.

Keep in mind that over time, raw honey could darken and likely crystallize. If it does happen, it doesn’t ruin the taste when taking it out of storage for use.

Our containers keep the honey air tight, but using a glass jar or plastic container works equally as well.

What is Wildflower Honey Used for in Baking?

Those new to using raw honey in baking are in for a real discovery on what it can do to spruce up numerous foods and drinks.

It goes beyond just baking and into the realm of flavoring mead, beer, BBQ sauces, and libations. For chefs, though, they can already tell you how great it is to have the scent of wildflowers in their recipes when they use wildflower honey.

Another thing to know is raw honey is always sweeter than sugar. As such, it’s a challenge using honey in an already sweet dessert recipe. Be sure to offset this so the sweetness doesn’t become overwhelming.

Raw honey in bulk is important to have on hand for your recipes if you have a sweet tooth and need an alternative to sugar.

Some other food ideas with use of wildflower honey:

Making mead with wildflower honey is a fun pastime for many people. It’s easier to make than beer, if mead already classified as a “honey wine.” How it gets made varies depending on personal taste, though it typically involves adding in fruits, spices, grains, or hops. The basic mix is fermented honey with water.

Creating beer with wildflower honey is just as popular. Most brewing experts say you should add about 1 cup or 1 gallon of honey per 5-gallon batch. You can also add it during the boiling process (to increase the alcohol content), to the fermenter, or during the high Krausen stage.

Adding raw honey to your BBQ sauces or drinks brings a unique flavor to both. Placing honey in a BBQ sauce adds a smooth sweetness, something the famous KC Masterpiece brand already does. Any alcoholic drink also becomes sweeter with a dash of wildflower honey thrown in.

Numerous creative desserts are always possible with this type of honey. Recipes ranging from oat waffles, fudge, to cookies all benefit from using honey to avoid elevating blood sugar levels.

Now you see why buying raw honey in bulk should become a top priority for food storage. During times when we’re stuck indoors, having raw honey readily available is a major gift when you want to avoid refined sugar.

Buy Your Raw Honey from a Wholesaler, Supplier, or Distributor

Buying raw honey in bulk means finding reliable sources that provide large enough supplies. We’re one of the few in the U.S. Northwest offering bulk raw honey products. We consider ourselves a combination of wholesaler, supplier, and distributor. These are essential qualities to look for when buying this type of honey in bulk since many bulk items are sold wholesale.

Fortunately, we provide an option to buy directly through us, or finding our products through the above-mentioned grocery stores. While many local farm stores sell wildflower honey, our attention to working with local farms makes all the difference in our value.

Nutrition Facts About Wildflower Honey

Anyone who has to look at food alternatives in their diet will find substantial nutrition in raw honey. Even if you’ve heard plenty about what it does to your health, the nutrition aspects are still worth examining.

A few things you may want to know about wildflower honey in particular:

How Many Carbs in Raw Honey?

Expect to get only 17g of carbs out of wildflower honey, which should work well if you eat it often while dieting. Then again, it does have 60 calories per serving size (21g), meaning conservative doses are always best.

How Much Sugar is in Raw Honey?

Diabetics turn to raw honey often because it has far less sugar content than regular sugar. Wildflower honey only has 16g of sugar, albeit still very sweet.

This is why, when using it for baking, it’s best to use raw honey alone rather than combine sugar into the recipe. Best of all, raw honey has no sodium or fat. Also, since it has no protein, many other foods mixed with honey provide this necessary nutrient.

If you need a little boost in your potassium level, raw honey does provide 11%. Still, the point of consuming wildflower honey is to find a healthy substitute for sugar.

Be sure to keep tabs on measuring other nutrition aspects of the foods you combine with raw honey. Considering raw honey continues being used often in desserts and even on meats, take caution on using any excess amounts of salt.

Common Questions About Raw Honey

We always get plenty of questions about our honey products. These three are some of the most common queries about wildflower honey in particular:

How Do You Decrystallize Raw Honey?

While storing your raw honey in bulk, it could crystalize over time, something that never ruins the taste. Still, it might not look appealing to someone who’s never seen crystalized honey before.

One way to decrystallize it is to place your container of honey into a pot of hot water. Let it liquefy while gently stirring. This works every time and only takes less than five minutes.

What is the Difference Between Raw Honey and Unfiltered Honey?

Raw honey always comes directly from the hive, though there are filtered and unfiltered versions of it on the market. We sell unfiltered, which means all original properties are still intact.

Filtered honey often has slight processing to remove small particles and even bee parts. Buying it unfiltered is as close to true raw as it gets.

How Old Do You Have to Be to Consume Raw Honey?

An important aspect to remember about raw honey is newborns shouldn’t consume it due to the possibility of botulism.

The recommendation is that you should wait to introduce your children to raw honey until they’re at least a year old.

Of course, it’s safe for everyone else at any age, including when storing it away for years in bulk.

If you’re looking to buy raw honey in bulk this year to fortify your food supplies, we’re always in stock for you at Artie’s Harvest.

Resources:

https://diethive.com/wildflower-honey/

https://grokonline.com.au/2019/07/14/would-you-eat-3000-year-old-honey/

https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-store-honey-1807772#storing-your-honey

https://www.localharvest.org/blog/49430/entry/wildflower_honey_for_cooking_and

https://www.growforagecookferment.com/how-to-make-wildflower-mead/

https://www.homebrewing.org/Wildflower-Honey-3-lbs_p_7061.html

https://www.kcmasterpiece.com/ingredients/wildflower-honey/

http://www.whitewildflowerhoney.com/recipes.html

https://www.eatthismuch.com/food/nutrition/wildflower-honey,456176/

https://www.healthline.com/health/parenting/when-can-babies-eat-honey#signs-of-botulism

Andrew Uhacz
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Does Raw Honey Go Bad?

Does Raw Honey Go Bad?

If you buy raw honey often for its antioxidant properties, and even for healing, have you ever wondered how long it really lasts?


  • Some people assume it won’t last long based on the idea anything raw will spoil sooner than later. In truth, raw honey doesn’t spoil, even if some caveats exist in making this happen.
  • Also, you can thank nature for making it never go bad. How you store it, however, makes all the difference. And if you have any newborns in the house, you have one serious thing to consider when storing raw honey for long periods of time.
  • Everyone knows the value of honey in its taste and through its healthful properties. When buying raw honey, you’re essentially consuming one of the greatest remedies around since early millennia.

What Makes Raw Honey Never Spoil?

To get into a little science here, spoilage all comes down to how much moisture generates in raw honey. What makes raw honey unique is it has a specific combination of acidity, lack of water, and hydrogen peroxide.This combination might not mean anything at first until you realize bacteria can’t live on anything not containing some moisture.

Now you know why when archeologists once found honey in the tombs of Ancient Egypt, they found the substance virtually intact. Maybe not many people would want to consume something that old (especially if any Egyptian curses), yet it really wouldn’t harm you.

The exact term for raw honey’s chemical makeup is hygroscopic. While not a term everyday people use, it describes how honey has virtually no water without outside influence. Yes, it could still get moisture if not properly sealed. Another advantage exists in raw honey seemingly lasting forever. It comes from its natural acidity.

How Acid Kills Bacteria

Did you know that honey has a low pH level, meaning it can easily kill any form of bacteria or fungi? No wonder it works as a natural antimicrobial agent for any human being.

In the realm of never spoiling, you now see the real science in why bacteria will never ruin honey over time. Yes, this means you can also keep honey in storage as a natural way to treat wounds.

The value of an acidic product like honey also means it can remove oxygen from wounds to aid healing. Regardless, it’s not enough acid to cause any kind of problems when consuming. Having the small amount of acid in there prevents bacteria from getting into your digestive system.

Because raw honey has a pH factor of roughly 3.26 to 4.48, it helps kill bacteria faster than other natural sugar foods would, like molasses. Even regular sugar doesn’t have the same level of low moisture content as raw honey.

To show you how the domino effect works in nature, a compelling reason exists why honey maintains such a lack of moisture.

Anyone concerned about bees dying out in the world will likely fret more when realizing what bees do to honey. Their natural body design is a direct influence on why honey is what it is.

The Microcosmic Aid of Flapping Bee Wings

When a bee works with nectar to make honey, the literal flapping of the bee’s wings while they work dries out the moisture inherent in nectar. It’s this very action removing any moisture from the end result as honey.

Talk about a butterfly effect, even if it ultimately comes from bees rather than butterflies.

To get a little more specific, bees also regurgitate nectar, which also carries glucose oxidase with it. Latter enzyme helps create the hydrogen peroxide seen in honey, along with the acidity.

The entire process of how honey gets made naturally has protective qualities, hence why it’s always safe to eat once it’s gathered. Not all natural foods are so fortunate, hence never having to worry about purifying honey before human consumption.

Not that honey still couldn’t spoil if not properly stored in your home. If not properly sealed, don’t expect honey to never eventually take in moisture.

Always Buy a Raw Honey Product Tightly Sealed

Most reliable raw honey products are going to be sealed as tightly as possible to avoid moisture from getting in. If you notice any container looking tampered, it’s a good bet the honey might already be spoiled.

Many stores selling honey place the product inside of airtight bottles. Although even these can get moisture inside if you don’t keep them sealed when you store them away.

The only real risk of leaving a bottle of honey out on a cupboard is ants could attack it, and even find a way inside. If they manage to get in, they could track moisture inside, essentially dooming the honey.

Crystallization sometimes occurs on raw honey products after being refrigerated. A lot of misconceptions occur with crystalized raw honey, with some people assuming the honey is spoiled when it looks this way.

Heating the honey will turn it back to its original form. Plus, freezing honey is a good option for storage since it helps slow down the crystalizing effect. Freezing also keeps it off your cupboard where ants could find it eventually.

Another thing to keep in mind about raw honey is the caution of having it in reach where a newborn could get ahold of it.

Babies Under One Year Old React Negatively to Honey

Raw honey might become spoiled if a newborn consumes it. Because raw honey has potential to cause botulism in infants, you need to keep it out of their reach until a little older.

Once they do taste it early in life, though, they’ll never want to stop from consuming raw honey on everything. Just be sure to teach them about how to properly store it so it never spoils.

Ironically, any raw honey you buy or make now with your children will still be edible when the great-grandchildren of your children exist in the future. One can only wonder how many jars of honey will be consumed hundreds of years from now that’s being made today.

Resources:

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-science-behind-honeys-eternal-shelf-life-1218690/?utm_campaign=20130822&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_source=tumblr.com&utm_content=surprisingsciencehoney

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324997#wounds

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/why-doesnt-honey-spoil_b_1914824

http://datasheets.scbt.com/sc-66043.pdf

https://www.businessinsider.com/babies-honey-infant-botulism-bacteria-health-danger-2019-3

Andrew Uhacz
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Guide for Substituting Honey for Sugar

Guide for Substituting Honey for Sugar

Most people know that sugar is one of the most dangerous substances to consume in the world. If such a statement sounds alarming, the most reliable health sources continue to back this science up.

Those who think sugar is impossible to avoid perhaps have a good argument. After all, sugar is in so many products, sometimes unknowingly. At the same time, we can all take personal initiative in avoiding sugar by using some substitutes.

One of the greatest examples of this is consuming raw honey. Anyone who’s eaten honey enough in life will know it can provide a natural sugar high. What makes this the best sugar substitute, though?

Is Raw Honey Really Sweeter Than Sugar?

Those who’ve tasted honey will know how much of a sweet blast of taste it offers. It’s true most people admit honey is sweeter than sugar itself.

One reason for that is it has 40% fructose and 30% glucose, still making it less than in regular table sugar. Regardless, because of this higher fructose level, you’re getting a sweeter taste overall.

Yes, this can raise blood sugar levels, so anyone diabetic needs to consume honey in moderation. The sweeter taste won’t cause potential health harm as regular sugar if not eaten in heavy amounts.

Since honey is also higher in calories, eating it in a moderated way is smart if watching your weight. Having a small amount daily also adds numerous health benefits not everyone knows about.

The GI Level of Honey

After years of you eating sugar on everything (including your cereal for breakfast), stop and consider honey has a lower GI value. This stands for “glycemic index”, meaning you can consume more honey without it raising your blood sugar as fast as sugar does.

Science shows honey usually has a GI value of around 58, making it within the safe zone for low GI foods. Sugar is always in the 70s, a dangerously high number. Besides, when GI is this high, you’re apt to have your blood sugar rise fast, then drop suddenly within a short time.

It’s possible to find some honey varieties with a lower GI number than listed above. In cases where the honey has lower fructose, it can mean GI’s below the 50s.

You might want to know what the GI level is of raw honey. When you buy honey directly from its source, the health benefits will help you far beyond when honey becomes processed.

Processed Honey Often Adds Sugar

A wide difference exists between buying raw honey and honey you’ve probably bought in stores your whole life.

Most store-bought honey is pasteurized, meaning it probably has sugars already added to make it even sweeter. Ultimately, this makes the GI level high as well, making it potentially harmful if consumed in large amounts.

Even if raw honey doesn’t look as smooth as pasteurized honey, you’re still getting all the natural ingredients straight from the beehive. Yes, this means more antioxidants in general and a GI in the 30s or 40s.

Because of the low glycemic effect from honey, many diabetics have been known to switch to honey as a sugar substitute. As more people learn about the benefits of that, it might make some wake up to what they’ve been doing to their health consuming sugar all their lives.

Finding Raw Honey as Your New Sugar Substitute

While many will argue sugar and honey are not all that far apart, buying raw honey creates a larger distinction.

Finding raw honey is not always easy because many major grocery store chains don’t carry it. You usually have to turn online to find anything close. Plus, raw honey might not look appealing at first, if most people never going back once realizing its organic properties.

Try squeezing some raw honey on your cereal and using it in those desserts you bake. You won’t lose any edge to the sweetness while knowing you’re getting amino acids, antioxidants, enzymes, minerals, and essential vitamins.

Resources:

https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/the-sweet-danger-of-sugar

https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/sugar-substitutes-honey-explained

https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/honey-and-diabetes#prevention

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/317728#Disadvantages-and-risks-of-honey

Andrew Uhacz
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What is Raw Honey?

What is Raw Honey?

Anything that has the word “raw” next to it might sound risky in a time when we’re all mindful of disease in what we consume. In the case of raw honey, there isn’t much to worry about.

What might confuse you when seeing “raw honey” is what the difference is with the normal honey you buy. There is a marked difference, including in the healthful properties involved.

Defining exactly what raw honey is helps you make better decisions on what type of honey to buy if you’re looking for the healthiest option.

What Differentiates Raw Honey from What You Normally Buy?

All that regular honey you’ve been buying for years is pasteurized, meaning it has a more pleasing appearance. Now you know why pasteurized honey is usually sold more in stores, merely because it “looks” better to the eye.

Only one problem occurs with the pasteurization process: A possibility exists it takes away all the antioxidants found in honey sold raw.

In contrast, raw honey isn’t always quite as smooth looking as the honey you probably buy. That’s why it’s called “raw”, because it’s taken right from the source and not containing additives to alter appearance/taste.

So is there a bias with raw honey not being in grocery stores, or is it easier to find than you think?

 Don’t Be Fooled With Pasteurized Honey

For years, you’ve likely purchased pasteurized honey in your local grocery. Because it looked more appealing, little did you know you were never gaining the fullest health benefits.

Regular honey is basically a processed food, meaning it also takes a lot of the pollen out of the product. Science shows bee pollen has numerous micronutrients and antioxidants as just starters. When a honey manufacturer heats the honey, much of that bee pollen evaporates.

No doubt much of this is eye-opening after years of buying favorite honey products with catchy packaging. Much of this is backed up by a health report from nine years ago saying three-fourths of all honey products sold in U.S. grocery stores were not really honey.

To make things worse, the FDA didn’t check these honey products to see if they contained pollen. It really isn’t any surprise you’ve probably bought honey for years and never knew there was a healthier option.

If you’re perplexed why raw honey isn’t more widely available, it’s a little easier to find nowadays. Nevertheless, you probably still won’t find it in a standard grocery store.

Where Can You Typically Find Raw Honey?

Keep in mind you might run across yet another option: Organic honey. With latter, it does come directly from bee farms, yet may also go through pasteurization and other processing.

In other words, if you see “organic honey” on a shelf, it’s really not the same as buying raw.

You’ll most likely have to turn online to find raw honey. A lot of online stores are now selling it, including a few standard online retailers. Those who do sell skip out on any processing and also avoid adding additional sugars as some honey manufacturers do.

If the raw honey you buy looks a different color, don’t be alarmed by it. Many people new to raw honey think that if it looks dark or crystallized, it might be spoiled.

In truth, raw honey is supposed to look different from the processed honey you’ve been used to. Based on climate factors, raw honey can often range in color from a light amber color to very dark. The dark types are generally a lot tastier.

The only real danger with raw honey is a risk of botulism in infants. As long as you keep it out of reach of newborns, you won’t have to worry about disease. At the same time, you’ll know you’re getting honey directly from the source where you thought you were getting it all along.

Resources:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324966#benefits

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25861358

http://localhoneyfinder.org/TypesAndFlavorsOfHoney.php

Andrew Uhacz
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Recipe for Baked Cheese Camembert with Rosemary & Honey

Recipe for Baked Cheese Camembert with Rosemary & Honey

Creating recipes with honey toppings have perhaps been neglected too much if wanting to enliven your cooking life. In a time when quarantine is placing everyone indoors indefinitely, learning how to use honey in a variety of dishes is worth all effort.

If you’re going to use honey, though, using raw honey will add all the antioxidants missing in regular honey.

Adding honey to something like a baked cheese Camembert might sound like something overly unusual. Take a look at how to go about creating this delicious cheese concoction for your next dinner.

What is Camembert?

Those of you still learning about cheese varieties will want to try Camembert, which is basically a creamy cheese with a white rind. It comes from Normandy, proving this part of Europe has always made the tastiest cheeses in the world.

The inside of this cheese is a bit yellowish, giving it a unique look compared to other types. Taking this cheese and baking it with seasonings will add something new to your menu.

When you add rosemary and raw honey to it, you’ll create a recipe that’s become a favorite for families going back 200 years.

Brie is the only other cheese type Camembert resembles. However, when adding a dash of raw honey to baked Camembert, your taste buds are going to awaken to something unique.

How Do You Start Creating This Recipe?

First, you’ll want to buy 8.8 oz. of round Camembert cheese. You might have to go to a specialty shop to find it, and it does cost a little more. The taste, though, will be more than worth it.

Next, buy fresh thyme and garlic. Buy a bottle of raw honey as well since you can use the honey for many other things beyond this recipe.

You’ll only need a small amount of each above item since the Camembert cheese is already large on its own. The point is to spruce up the taste of the cheese round and bake it.

How Much of Each Item into the Cheese?

Before you apply the ingredients, you have to cut holes into the top surface of the cheese. Any knife will do for creating the holes. It’s here where you’ll insert the garlic for added flavor.

Once you’ve created the cheese holes, simply cut up one clove of garlic and dump it in. Also sprinkle in two tablespoons of fresh thyme.

Have your honey on standby since you’ll be placing that on top of the cheese.

Placing the Thyme and Honey On the Cheese

After placing the garlic in the cheese holes, add your clove of garlic and two tablespoons of raw honey onto the surface. Preheat your oven to 350F, then let bake for about fifteen minutes.

As some sources say, when this is ready to eat, it might  look almost too beautiful to eat. The taste will be unforgettable since cheese and honey always pair well. Plus, you’re gaining various health benefits.

Best described as like fondue, you can take pieces of bread and dip right into this dish. Since the cheese will be creamy, it almost works like a cheesy dip for virtually anything, including chips or breadsticks.

At only about 115 calories, this isn’t bad if you’re on a diet. Plus, it provides around 5.6 kg of carbs, not including gaining antioxidants from using the raw honey topping.

Just remember: if you buy raw honey for this recipe, you need to make sure what you buy really is raw. You’ll likely have to turn online to find raw honey since far too many grocery stores still sell the processed and pasteurized kind you’ve no doubt eaten for years.

Resources:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Camembert

https://recipecenter.giantfood.com/recipes/99409/honey-and-thyme-baked-camembert

Creating recipes with honey toppings have perhaps been neglected too much if wanting to enliven your cooking life. In a time when quarantine is placing everyone indoors indefinitely, learning how to use honey in a variety of dishes is worth all effort.

If you’re going to use honey, though, using raw honey will add all the antioxidants missing in regular honey.

Adding honey to something like a baked cheese Camembert might sound like something overly unusual. Take a look at how to go about creating this delicious cheese concoction for your next dinner.

What is Camembert?

Those of you still learning about cheese varieties will want to try Camembert, which is basically a creamy cheese with a white rind. It comes from Normandy, proving this part of Europe has always made the tastiest cheeses in the world.

The inside of this cheese is a bit yellowish, giving it a unique look compared to other types. Taking this cheese and baking it with seasonings will add something new to your menu.

When you add rosemary and raw honey to it, you’ll create a recipe that’s become a favorite for families going back 200 years.

Brie is the only other cheese type Camembert resembles. However, when adding a dash of raw honey to baked Camembert, your taste buds are going to awaken to something unique.

How Do You Start Creating This Recipe?

First, you’ll want to buy 8.8 oz. of round Camembert cheese. You might have to go to a specialty shop to find it, and it does cost a little more. The taste, though, will be more than worth it.

Next, buy fresh thyme and garlic. Buy a bottle of raw honey as well since you can use the honey for many other things beyond this recipe.

You’ll only need a small amount of each above item since the Camembert cheese is already large on its own. The point is to spruce up the taste of the cheese round and bake it.

How Much of Each Item into the Cheese?

Before you apply the ingredients, you have to cut holes into the top surface of the cheese. Any knife will do for creating the holes. It’s here where you’ll insert the garlic for added flavor.

Once you’ve created the cheese holes, simply cut up one clove of garlic and dump it in. Also sprinkle in two tablespoons of fresh thyme.

Have your honey on standby since you’ll be placing that on top of the cheese.

Placing the Thyme and Honey On the Cheese

After placing the garlic in the cheese holes, add your clove of garlic and two tablespoons of raw honey onto the surface. Preheat your oven to 350F, then let bake for about fifteen minutes.

As some sources say, when this is ready to eat, it might  look almost too beautiful to eat. The taste will be unforgettable since cheese and honey always pair well. Plus, you’re gaining various health benefits.

Best described as like fondue, you can take pieces of bread and dip right into this dish. Since the cheese will be creamy, it almost works like a cheesy dip for virtually anything, including chips or breadsticks.

At only about 115 calories, this isn’t bad if you’re on a diet. Plus, it provides around 5.6 kg of carbs, not including gaining antioxidants from using the raw honey topping.

Just remember: if you buy raw honey for this recipe, you need to make sure what you buy really is raw. You’ll likely have to turn online to find raw honey since far too many grocery stores still sell the processed and pasteurized kind you’ve no doubt eaten for years.

Resources:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Camembert

https://recipecenter.giantfood.com/recipes/99409/honey-and-thyme-baked-camembert

https://presidentcheese.com/recipes/camembert-cheese/baked-president-camembert-with-honey-rosemary-sprigs/

Andrew Uhacz
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